Weekly musings on the arts and current events.

Tuesday, January 11, 2011

Tucson: After and Beyond



I wish I could start a movement to vote against any candidate who uses incendiary language, who denounces the opposition as unpatriotic or ungodly, who makes a virtue out of refusing to listen to those who disagree, or who demonizes those who are willing to meet opponents halfway.

It used to be called the wisdom of Solomon: to see both sides of an argument. But nowadays such wisdom is going out of style. Being able to hold two contradictory ideas in mind at the same time is beyond most people's talents, but that's the ability we have to cultivate, for that is the test of our capacity to love: to care about those we don't agree with.

My, but I sound like a preacher. Sorry. I'm really just a confused middle-of-the-roader who wishes the left or the right had all the answers. But they don't. I suspect the answers have yet to be thought of. I'm not sure we've even asked the right questions.


Solomon by Marcos Zapata, from the Humahuaca Cathedral, Jujuy Province, Argentina; 1764. Although the technique is broad and perhaps hasty, I'm intrigued by the reverent, downcast gazes of the gargoyles whittled on the king's chair, while he looks upward to his inspiration. His pen, which seems more like an arrow than a plume, and his flash of leg, both remind us that Solomon was a lusty and courageous flesh-and-blood man of the world, rather than an ethereal or ascetic saint. Click on the picture for a closer look.

5 comments:

Griever said...

Seems the stupid people are in the majority all over the world.

DUTA said...

There's no need for a King Solomon, as the future of America will probably not depend on the existing political parties. These parties have had their chances, and now they Must free the arena for some other political factor.

As for Tucson. The first shock caused by the news about the tragedy in Tucson was followed by another shock - the news regarding the rally itself.

Despite previous threats, and the explosive atmosphere in Arizona, it seemed the rally was conducted as if it were some sort of picnic. No security men were around to 'sterilize' the place.

Every politician should bear in mind that politics is not only about honour and fame, but also about dirt (propaganda, incitement) and danger (assassination), and he/she should act accordingly , take precautions.

Now to the main relevant question -How come the killer, who was known as a mentally deranged loner owned a gun?!

Paula Slade said...

If you get that movement started, please let me know - I'll join you!

dragonfly said...

"Being able to hold two contradictory ideas in mind at the same time is beyond most people's talents, but that's the ability we have to cultivate, for that is the test of our capacity to love: to care about those we don't agree with."

- Well put, I love this. As one "middle-of-the-roader" to another, I heartily agree.

TallTchr said...

@Griever: you may be right about the stupid, but let's hope the crazies never reach majority status.

@Duta: I don't think it was a rally: just a small scale neighborhood event. Members of Congress aren't assigned any Secret Service protection unless they're conspicuous targets, like the late Teddy Kennedy. As for America's gun laws...oy.

@Paula: Do you think people will still be in the mood for comity when the next election comes around, or will it be back to rage and denunciation?

@Dragonfly: Thank you for your kind words.